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5 historical figures with a vision for Pride 2019

As London prepares to be drowned in colour this weekend for Pride 2019, we’re shining a light on the people who’ve had a strong vision for change in the LGBT community over the past 50 years.

Scroll down to read about 5 people throughout history who have demonstrated a vision for LGBT rights around the world, and have dedicated their lives to making a change.

1. Karl Heinrich Ulrichs: a German lawyer, journalist, and author who is seen today as a pioneer of the modern gay rights movement, and the first gay person to publicly speak out for homosexual rights.

2. Barbara Gittings. Widely regarding as the mother of the LGBT civil rights movement. Although Gittings lived in Philadelphia, in 1958 she started the New York chapter of the Daughters of Bilitis (DOB). Founded in San Francisco, the DOB was the first lesbian civil rights organisation in the United States. From 1963 to 1966, Gittings was the editor of the DOB’s publication, The Ladder, the first national lesbian magazine.

3. Harvey Milk. Harvey Bernard Milk was an American politician and the first openly gay elected official in the history of California.

4. Audre Lorde. Audre Geraldine Lorde was born in 1934, and went on to become a leading African-American poet and essayist who gave voice to issues of race and sexuality.

5. Christine Jorgensen. The transgender ex-GI. Christine Jorgensen, a U.S Army veteren and Bronx native, was the first American woman to publicly announce her gender reassignment surgery. Following reports of her transition in the 1950s, she embraced fame and acted as a spokesperson for transgender people.